Parental Depression and Children Syracuse NY

While depressed parents don't necessarily harm their children -- deliberately or inadvertently -- studies in Syracuse have shown parental depression can increase the chances of children having health, emotional and behavioral problems.

Dr. Deborah Welsh
Full Circle Center for Creative Arts Therapy and Mental Health Counseling
(315) 479-7718
404 Oak St.. Suite 205
Syracuse, NY
Credentials
Credentials: Ed.D
Licensed in New York
21 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Domestic Violence, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Sexual Abuse/Rape, Spiritual/Religious Concerns, Stress, Trauma/PTSD, Education/Personal Development, Life Transi
Populations Served
Step Families
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Joanna Bogdan-Fyles
Joanna Bogdan-Fyles, LCSW, PLLC
(315) 234-0213
600 East Genesee St, Suite 228
Syracuse, NY
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in New York
22 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Interpersonal Relationships, Parenting Issues, Stress, Life Transitions, Men's Issues, Women's Issues
Populations Served
Children of Divorce, Step Families
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Mr. Gregg Heffner
Gregg A Heffner, LCSW-R
(315) 415-9795
49 Oswego Street 1st Floor Office-Rear
Baldwinsville, NY
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW-R
Licensed in New York
12 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Behavioral Problems, Bipolar Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Sexual Orientation, Stress, Life Transitions, Men's Issues
Populations Served
AIDS/HIV+, Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Chronic Illness
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Kevin Howard
(315) 472-4471
Syracuse, NY
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

James Lewis
(315) 425-1943
Syracuse, NY
Practice Areas
Addictions and Dependency, Eating Disorders, Couples & Family, Sexual Abuse Recovery, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Ms. Shannon Rice
Wellness Therapy Center
(315) 703-0168
731 James Street Suite 223
Syracuse, NY
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW-R
Licensed in New York
19 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Addictions/Other (gambling, sex, etc.), Addictions/Substance, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Bipolar Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Dual Diagnosis
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics)
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Harriet Casey
(315) 488-5734
4175 Old Winding Way
Syracuse, NY
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in New York
27 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Depression, Family Dysfunction, Parenting Issues, Stress, Trauma/PTSD, Life Transitions, Women's Issues
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), College Students
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Preschool (Under 6), Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Paul F Pickett
(315) 701-5850
Syracuse, NY
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Sexual Abuse Recovery, Supervision
Certifications
Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor, National Certified Counselor

Sarah Spiegelhoff
Syracuse, NY
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Counselor Education, Couples & Family, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Ms. Donna Dallal-Ferne
(315) 538-3160
Change in Motion Healing Arts
Syracuse, NY
Specialties
Relationship Issues, Divorce, Loss or Grief
Qualification
School: Syracuse University
Year of Graduation: 2005
Years In Practice: 5 Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Age: Adolescents / Teenagers (14 to 19),Adults
Average Cost
$60 - $80
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes

Data Provided by:

Parental Depression and Children

Provided By:

WEDNESDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- When parents are depressed, their children can suffer too.

A new report from the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine calls for health and social service professionals to pay greater attention to the impact of parental depression on their children.

Rather than treating only the depressed adult, health-care and mental-health professionals should evaluate the fallout of the depression on the entire family, particularly children, and design treatment programs with everyone in mind, according to the report that was to be released Wednesday.

Since most depression counseling and treatment programs are designed to deal only with the depressed individual, federal and state agencies, nonprofit organizations and private-sector providers should work to find nontraditional ways of helping the whole family, the report says.

"To break the vicious circle of depression, we need to refocus our view of this illness through a broader lens that sees the whole family, not just the individual with depression," said committee chair and psychiatrist Mary Jane England, president of Regis College in Weston, Mass. "Our report describes a new vision for depression care that would provide comprehensive services not just to adults, but to their children as well. It will take significant policy changes to make this vision a reality, but the benefits warrant the effort."

About one in five U.S. parents experience depression annually. About 15.6 million children under 18 live with an adult who has had major depression in the past year, the report noted.

While depressed parents don't necessarily harm their children -- deliberately or inadvertently -- studies have shown parental depression can increase the chances of children having health, emotional and behavioral problems.

Yet, even if health-care professionals come up with creative ways to include all family members in the treatment plan, obstacles remain. Only one-third of adult sufferers seek treatment for their depression, which means their children probably won't get treatment either.

Removing barriers to coordinating care across agencies and service providers, asking patients with depression if they have children and if their depression affects family members and requiring health plans to cover a greater range of mental-health services would help put the focus on the family, according to the report.

In addition, making affordable depression treatment available outside of traditional doctor's offices may encourage people to make use of the services. Suggested locations include Head Start facilities, schools, prisons, other community locations and people's homes.

The report also called on states to revise regulations that prohibit services from being offered outside of clinical settings, and urged federal agencies to establish a national program to improve the ability of primary-care providers, mental-health and substance-abuse professionals to treat depression and lessen its effects on children.

To help protect children from the negative impact of parental depression, the report suggested that Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) extend Medicaid services for new mothers to two years after birth, a critical period of development.

CMS could reimburse primary-care providers for mental-health services and cover preventive services for children at risk of developing problems, rather than cover treatment only after problems occur.

The study was sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Annie E. Casey Foundation, California Endowment, U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Mental Health has more on depression.

SOURCE: U.S. National Academy of Sciences, news release, June 10, 2009

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