Spying Leading to Identity Theft Syracuse NY

Most people assume that corporate espionage is just James Bond stuff. However, according to USA Today , even small and medium businesses are at risk . Spying has been going on since the beginning of time, and it's alive and well today. In most cases, spying starts because a person or entity needs or wants information that is otherwise kept confidential or private from prying eyes.

Donalda Jean Gillies
(845) 291-2454
Po Box 328
Goshen, NY
Specialties
Criminal Defense, DUI, Identity Theft
Education
Yeshiva University, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law
State Licensing
Connecticut, New York

Eric C. Freed
(212) 389-5055
Sutherland Asbill Et Al, 1114 Ave of The Americas
New York, NY
Specialties
Insurance, Identity Theft
State Licensing
Connecticut, Pennsylvania

Gary Alan Kibel
(212) 468-4918
1740 Broadway
New York, NY
Specialties
Advertising, Intellectual Property, Identity Theft
State Licensing
Connecticut, New York

Credit Bureau Svces of Upstate Ny
(315) 461-4001
614 James St
Syracuse, NY
 
Rachel Lynn Samuels
(212) 459-7186
Po Box 41
North Chatham, NY
Specialties
Business, Social Security, Identity Theft
State Licensing
New York

Daniel Henry Fink
(603) 627-8132
477 Fdr Dr Apt M1604
New York, NY
Specialties
Intellectual Property, Copyright Infringement, Identity Theft
State Licensing
New York

Richard Polk Lawson
(212) 608-2391
225 Broadway Fl 13
New York, NY
Specialties
Criminal Defense, Identity Theft, Fraud
Education
The Florida State University College of Law
State Licensing
DC, Florida, New York

Eastern Credit Services
(315) 214-0079
428 S Main St
Syracuse, NY
 

Spying Leading to Identity Theft

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Spying leads to identity theft

Posted by Robert Siciliano on July 30th, 2009

Robert Siciliano is a NextAdvisor.com Expert Guest Blogger

Most people assume that corporate espionage is just James Bond stuff. However, according to USA Today , even small and medium businesses are at risk . Spying has been going on since the beginning of time, and it's alive and well today. In most cases, spying starts because a person or entity needs or wants information that is otherwise kept confidential or private from prying eyes.

Most people have probably spied at some point in their lives. Maybe as children, rifling through siblings' or parents' closets and drawers. Or as teenagers, spying on a boyfriend or girlfriend in an attempt to determine why a first relationship wasn't working out. Or as parents, hoping to protect children from themselves. Hopefully this type of behavior subsides as we grow older and learn to trust others. But some people find serious reasons to spy as adults. This behavior can eventually culminate in stalking, which is, of course, illegal and can end in tragedy.

There are plenty of tools to facilitate spying. There are more ways of gathering intelligence than ever before. An online search for "spy shop" or "spy store" turns up a vast collection of small wireless cameras, listening devices, software, and hardware that can help the customer collect enough data on their target to do some damage, or uncover sensitive information.

Spyware is commercially available software that can track keystrokes, emails, and instant messages. In the wrong hands, it can be quite damaging. Keycatchers are hardware devices that can be installed in the back of a PC in order to record raw data.

It is necessary to monitor childrens' Internet use, but an open dialogue is equally important.If a person has suspicions about his or her spouse, that's an entirely different scenario, requiring a different set of rules. Be aware that if you spy or cheat on a loved one, you ought to be prepared for the consequences.

Protecting yourself and your business from this type of spying is difficult, but possible. Always keep in mind that those on the “inside,” such as friends, family members, employees, or people who have special access and could potentially be paid off, like a cleaning person or a security guard, can access sensitive data.

  1. Make sure that there are no mysterious hardware devices attached to your computer.
  2. Sweep your home for audio recording devices. You can either hire someone to do this, or do an online search for a tool that will help you.
  3. Password protect the administrator account on your computer, to prevent unauthorized software installation.
  4. Run a spyware removal program.
  5. Never leave file cabinets unlocked, or paper work lying around.
  6. Shed any document that may contain sensitive data before throwing it out.
  7. Lock down your wireless connections, since they are often the path of least resistance.
  8. Don’t disclose too much personal information on social networks, since that makes it easy for people to spy on you.
  9. Know that identity thieves have access to all these tools as well, so protect yourself. Get a credit freeze . Go to ConsumersUnion.org and follow the steps for your particular state. This is an absolutely necessary tool to secure your credit. In most cases, it prevents new accounts from being opened in your name. This makes your Social Security number useless to a potential identity thief.
  10. And invest in identity theft protection . Not all forms of identity theft protection can be prevented, but identity theft protection services can dramatically reduce your risk.

Robert Siciliano, identity theft speaker, discusses mobile phone stalking and spying on The Tyra Banks Show.

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Robert Siciliano is CEO of IDTheftSecurity.com , an identity theft expert, professional speaker, security analyst, published author and television news correspondent. Siciliano works with Fortune 1000 companies and startups as an advisor on product launches, branding, messaging, representation, SEO and media. Siciliano's thoughts and advice on all these matters appear often in both the televised and print news media including CNN, MSNBC, CNBC, FOX, Forbes and USA Today. He has 25 years of security training as a member of the American Society of Industrial Security. He is the author of two books, including The Safety Minute: Living on High Alert; How to take control of your personal security and prevent fraud . He's also partnered with Uni-Ball to help raise awareness about the growing threat of identity theft and to provide tips on how you can protect yourself.

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