Tonsil Cancer Syracuse NY

Surgery on tonsil cancer patients can spell trouble for the palate, but now researchers say they've developed a technique that helps preserve the ability to speak clearly and eat most foods. Traditionally, surgeons use big pieces of tissue to reconstruct the area after tonsil tumors are removed. But the patients who undergo this treatment can suffer "quality of life issues," study author Dr. Douglas Chepeha, an associate professor of otolaryngology, head and neck surgery and director of the microvascular program at the University of Michigan Health System, said in a school news release.

Nabila Adham Elbadawi, MD
(315) 474-4475
815 James St
Syracuse, NY
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Oncology (Cancer), Radiation Oncology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Kasr El Aini Fac Med Cairo Univ, Cairo (915-02 After 1/1971)
Graduation Year: 1960

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Kathy Faber Langendoen, MD
750 E Adams St
Syracuse, NY
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Oncology (Cancer)
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Female
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Medical School: Washington Univ Sch Of Med, St Louis Mo 63110
Graduation Year: 1986

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Michael Meguid, MD
(315) 464-6277
750 E Adams St
Syracuse, NY
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Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of London, Univ Coll, Sch Of Med (See 917-34)
Graduation Year: 1968

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Ajeet Gajra, MD
(315) 425-3456
800 Irving Ave (111)
Syracuse, NY
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Oncology (Cancer)
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Male
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Medical School: Maulana Azad Med Coll, Univ Of Delhi, New Delhi, Delhi, India
Graduation Year: 1993

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Thomas E Coyle
(315) 464-8200
750 E Adams St
Syracuse, NY
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Internal Medicine, Hematology / Oncology

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Robert Hutchison
(315) 464-6751
750 E Adams St
Syracuse, NY
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Hematology

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Mark David Adelson, MD
(315) 423-4222
1200 E Genesee St Ste 205
Syracuse, NY
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Oncology (Cancer), Gynecological Oncology, Gynecology
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Male
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Medical School: Med Coll Of Ohio, Toledo Oh 43699
Graduation Year: 1979
Hospital
Hospital: St Josephs Hospital Health Cen, Syracuse, Ny; Crouse Hosp, Syracuse, Ny
Group Practice: Comprehensive Gynecology

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Chung Taik Chung, MD
(315) 464-5276
750 E Adams St
Syracuse, NY
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Oncology (Cancer), Radiation Oncology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Yonsei Univ, Coll Of Med, Sudai-Moon-Ku, Seoul, So Korea
Graduation Year: 1967

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Chung-Taik Chung
(315) 464-5276
750 E Adams St
Syracuse, NY
Specialty
Radiation Oncology

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Abdul Kader Souid
(315) 464-5294
750 E Adams St
Syracuse, NY
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Pediatric Hematology-Oncology

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Tonsil Cancer

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FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Surgery on tonsil cancer patients can spell trouble for the palate, but now researchers say they've developed a technique that helps preserve the ability to speak clearly and eat most foods.

Traditionally, surgeons use big pieces of tissue to reconstruct the area after tonsil tumors are removed. But the patients who undergo this treatment can suffer "quality of life issues," study author Dr. Douglas Chepeha, an associate professor of otolaryngology, head and neck surgery and director of the microvascular program at the University of Michigan Health System, said in a school news release.

The treatment "affects speech and eating -- typically, patients have difficulty eating when they have this kind of tumor and undergo surgery," he said.

The new treatment, which uses tissue from another part of the body, helps ensure that the tongue can move more efficiently.

The study authors, who report their findings in the current issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery, followed 25 patients with tonsil cancer for an average of five years.

"In particular, patients who have less than half their palate removed do very well with this reconstruction. We're trying to make sure the remaining tongue and palate they have really work. Our goal is to get patients eating in public and back to work," Chepeha said.

Tonsil cancer is a form of throat cancer, which will kill an estimated 2,230 Americans this year.

More information

Learn more about throat cancer from the National Cancer Institute.

SOURCE: University of Michigan Health System, news release, September 2009

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