Ventilation for Good Breathing Syracuse NY

People with chronic respiratory disorders in Syracuse who receive early non-invasive ventilation after a breathing tube has been removed are less likely to suffer respiratory failure or die, a Spanish study has found. The study included 106 people on mechanical ventilation. All of them had high levels of carbon dioxide in their blood, a condition known as hypercapnia.

Anthony Alfred Ascioti, MD
(315) 448-5440
301 Prospect Ave
Syracuse, NY
Specialties
Anesthesiology, Pulmonary Diseases
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Suny-Hlth Sci Ctr At Syracuse, Coll Of Med, Syracuse Ny 13210
Graduation Year: 1971

Data Provided by:
Pratibha Kaul
(315) 425-4400
800 Irving Ave
Syracuse, NY
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care (Intensivists)

Data Provided by:
Mansur Javaid, MD
(315) 424-1161
50 Presidential Plz Apt 507
Syracuse, NY
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Diseases
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: King Edward Med Coll, Univ Of Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided by:
Shahzad Jokhio
(315) 464-4530
750 E Adams St
Syracuse, NY
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care (Intensivists)

Data Provided by:
John H Sipple, MD
(315) 479-5070
739 Irving Ave
Syracuse, NY
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Diseases
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Cornell Univ Med Coll, New York Ny 10021
Graduation Year: 1955

Data Provided by:
James F Sexton
(315) 464-3835
90 Presidential Plz
Syracuse, NY
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care (Intensivists)

Data Provided by:
Ran Dani Anbar, MD
(315) 464-6323
750 E Adams St
Syracuse, NY
Specialties
Pediatrics, Pediatric Pulmonology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Chicago, Pritzker Sch Of Med, Chicago Il 60637
Graduation Year: 1983

Data Provided by:
Shahzad Jokhio, MD
750 E Adams St
Syracuse, NY
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Critical Care Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Dow Med Coll, Univ Of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan
Graduation Year: 1996

Data Provided by:
Sandhya Khurana, MD
800 Irving Ave
Syracuse, NY
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Critical Care Medicine
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Coll Of Med Scis, Univ Of Delhi, New Delhi, Delhi, India
Graduation Year: 1992

Data Provided by:
Zafer Soultan
(315) 464-4842
750 E Adams St
Syracuse, NY
Specialty
Pediatrics, Pediatric Pulmonology

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Ventilation for Good Breathing

Provided By:

People with chronic respiratory disorders who receive early non-invasive ventilation after a breathing tube has been removed are less likely to suffer respiratory failure or die, a Spanish study has found.

The study included 106 people on mechanical ventilation. All of them had high levels of carbon dioxide in their blood, a condition known as hypercapnia. After their internal breathing tubes were removed, in a procedure called extubation, 54 people received non-invasive ventilation for 24 hours and 52 were given conventional oxygen treatment, the according to the study.

Respiratory failure after extubation occurred in 15 percent of those who received non-invasive ventilation and in 48 percent of people given conventional oxygen therapy. Non-invasive ventilation was associated with an 83 percent decreased risk for respiratory failure after extubation, the researchers found.

They also found that the death rate after 90 days was much lower among people in the non-invasive ventilation group (11 percent) than among those who received conventional oxygen therapy (31 percent).

"Early non-invasive ventilation after extubation diminished risk of respiratory failure and lowered 90-day mortality in patients with hypercapnia during a spontaneous breathing trial," concluded Dr. Miquel Ferrer, of the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, and his research colleagues. "Routine implementation of this strategy for management of mechanically ventilated patients with chronic respiratory disorders is advisable."

The study appears online this week and in an upcoming print issue of The Lancet.

More information

The U.S. National Women's Health Information Center has more about lung disease.

SOURCE: The Lancet, news release, Aug. 12, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

Read Article at HealthDay.com