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X-rays and Dogs Syracuse NY

One major problem in dogs in Syracuse that needs the use of an x-ray is hip dysplasia. This condition results in intense arthritis problems in the animal. What causes hip dysplasia is a defect in the connection of the dog’s femur to their pelvis. The socket connecting the two is shallow and the ball of the femur is often rough and malformed, instead of a smooth, round fit for the socket.

PETCO
(315) 454-3949
310 Northern Lights (Route 11)
North Syracuse, NY
Hours
Monday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Tuesday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Wednesday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Thursday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Friday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Saturday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Sunday: 10:00am-6:00pm

PETCO
(315) 449-0084
3150 Erie Boulevard East Suite #500
Dewitt, NY
Hours
Monday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Tuesday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Wednesday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Thursday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Friday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Saturday: 9:00am-9:00pm
Sunday: 10:00am-6:00pm

PetSmart
(315) 446-6320
3401 Erie Blvd E
Syracuse, NY
Hours
Monday - Friday: 9:00-9:00
Sunday: 10:00-6:00

PetSmart
(315) 652-1627
3865 State Route 31
Liverpool, NY
Hours
Monday - Friday: 9:00-9:00
Sunday: 10:00-6:00

Pet Express Of Central Ny, Inc.
(315) 458-0852
7687 Frontage Road
Cicero, NY
 
PetSmart
(315) 468-1379
3553 West Genesee
Syracuse, NY
Hours
Monday - Friday: 9:00-9:00
Sunday: 10:00-6:00

Pet World - Dewitt
(315) 445-9510
3649 Erie Blvd. E.
Dewitt, NY
 
Pet Depot
(315) 487-6533
3730 Milton Avenue
Camillus, NY
 
Ebeling's Pet Center
(315) 652-2329
4138 Route 31
Clay, NY
 
Petland Of Syracuse
(315) 752-0444
5701 East Circle Drive
Cicero, NY
 

X-rays and Dogs

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Not all doggy problems are visible from the outside. A lot of times a dog may have a problem that would not be obvious without the help of an x-ray. Bone related problems in dogs like hip dysplasia or elbow dysplasia or a bone fracture may not be seen or attended to without the help of an x-ray. The same goes for cardiovascular problems like mitral valve disease or cardiomyopathy. You might not have any idea that your pet has a bladder stone or a tumor without an x-ray. Dogs, like children, have a habit of swallowing things they shouldn’t- such as toys, nails, pebbles, needles or any number of household items. These things left in your animal’s gastrointestinal tract could easily cause a major problem if left unattended and would need an x-ray to discover where and what the blockage is.


One major problem in dogs that needs the use of an x-ray is hip dysplasia. This condition results in intense arthritis problems in the animal. What causes hip dysplasia is a defect in the connection of the dog’s femur to their pelvis. The socket connecting the two is shallow and the ball of the femur is often rough and malformed, instead of a smooth, round fit for the socket. This defect of the hip joint causes much friction and, consequently, horrible arthritis in the dog. The animal’s body will naturally rebuild cartilage, but this process is a slow one because cartilage is not a vascular tissue (i.e. a tissue with veins pushing blood into it). The defective joint may or may not be able to support the dog’s body weight. The problem joint will perpetually become inflamed this breaks down the forming cartilage and causes much pain in the animal. Hip dysplasia will also cause osteoarthritis in the animal’s bones which is visible on an x-ray. Utilizing an x-ray in this situation can help tell us what is wrong with the animal for certain and that will lead us to the appropriate method of treatment.


While dog x-rays are an important tool in keeping our animals healthy, they are not foolproof. X-rays require an animal to remain still during the procedure and sometimes this may be impossible or close to it. If a dog squirms during an x-ray, a distorted view of his insides could be seen, leading to potential wrong diagnosis. Some measures can be taken to keep the dog still as possible- the owner or a technician can help hold your animal down, or if it is a huge hassle, a light anesthetic can be given. Another thing that may complicate your pet’s x-ray results is very subtle problems. Small shifts in bones which are hard to see are a potential problem in diagnosing doggy illness, such as hip dysplasia. While reading x-rays is not exactly a perfect science, do not discard them, even if they led your veterinarian to say your pet is perfectly healthy. The x-ray results should be filed away for future reference and may be needed if your animal has additional problems in the future or you have to change vets.


Your pet’s x-rays may not lead your vet to a particular diagnosis at all, in which case they will be considered inconclusive. If this is the case, refrain from breeding your dog until the animal is older and the results are definitive. Once the dog is full grown, the development and placement of his bones should be apparent. The OFA (Orthopedic Foundation for Animals) has a policy of waiting until a dog is 2 years of age before they will classify their hips.
Other than these joint and bone problems, people can have their animals x-rayed to check for blood clots, bladder stones or esophageal achalasia or even small bone fractures that we might not be aware of.


X-rays have become an indispensable tool to the veterinary community and the field of veterinary science and are just another thing that can help keep our furry friends healthy.


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